Nikon D7200 vs D750 vs D610

May 4, 2015

Nikon D7200, D750 and D610 side by side

In this article I’ll be comparing the Nikon D7200 APS-C DSLR versus two other Nikon Full Frame DSLR cameras, the D610 and D750. This comparison is useful for those of you whom are still debating whether to buy a new or upgrade to an APS-C Nikon camera, or make the brave leap, spend more and buy of of Nikon’s Full Frame cameras. It’s not an easy one, and you need to get some good understanding of the key differences before making up your mind.

Let’s take a look at the current prices first:

  • D7200 (body): ~$1200
  • D610 (body): ~$1500
  • D750 (body): ~$2000

*rounded up prices as of 5.4.2015 via amazon.com. Visit amazon.com for updated prices.

As you can see, the D7200 is the cheapest among the three, but it’s in now way a cheap camera. In can tickle you when you see that by adding $300 more you can buy a the D610, a full frame DSLR. The D750 is more expensive, and might be out of many people’s reach.  That being said, without knowing what we actually are paying for, we can’t really make a smart buying decision. We need to know that if we spend that amount of money, we will fully take advantage of what the camera has to offer. We don’t want to waste money on features that we won’t use.

I’ll start with a short introduction to the D7200 which is the pivot for out comparison, and then we’ll move on to the comparison section.

Nikon D7200

The Nikon D7200 was the most anticipated mid-range DSLR in 2014 and was announced on March 2 2015, approximately two years after the D7100. The D7200 still maintains the same exact camera build quality, weather-sealing and build quality as its predecessor, but update the camera in places were enthusiasts want it to be improved. It’s doesn’t offer substantial improvement though, but those improvements certainly useful to photographers.

Nikon D7200

D7200 now features the same 24MP sensor as the D5500, which is an excellent sensor. Don’t be alarmed, this is an excellent sensor that performs amazingly in high ISO speeds. I would probably wished that Nikon had used a lower resolution sensor just for us to have a spectacular high ISO performance, so I’m a beat disappointed that we didn’t get to have that.

Nikon optimized the camera upon its predecessor by making it better for low-light photography. The new upgraded sensor is one thing, but Nikon also improved it in several ways. First of all, the new D7200 features Expeed 4 image processor, replacing the Expeed 3 of the D7100.   This is the same processor that is used in the D750, D5300 and D3300. It offers Full HD 60fps video capture with improved contrast-detection AF (no Hybrid AF, which is quite disappointing considering that the Canon EOS 70D has it). It consumes less power, it’s twice more powerful than the Expeed 3 and has updates noise reduction algorithms. The new image processor should give the D7200 the power it needs to performer faster and supports its new upgraded features.

Before we continue, here’s an excellent D7200 hands-on field test made by TheCameraStoreTV, I recommend watching it.

One of my favorite updates was the addition of the new Multi-CAM 3500DX II autofocus system, That AF system is 1-stop more sensitive than the D7100, featuring -3EV detection range. This means that the camera can autofocus in even dimmer lighting conditions. So it’s one of the most important features that you want to get if you need to shoot under restricted lighting conditions.

The D7200 also features a 1.3x crop mode, same as the D7100. Using this mode, the camera utilizes only part of the sensor area. This has several advantage: it result in change in the angle of view, which is equivalent to that of a lens with double the focal length (in 35mm terms). Furthermore, because the frame is smaller, the AF point now covers almost the entire area of the frame, all the 51 focus point. This improves the subject tracking performance, because any subjected that enters the frame from either right or left side, is immidetely detected by the AF points. This is a great feature to use when shooting sports events, widlife, journalism, kids running or any subjects that enters the frame fast. You also have the option to change to 11 AFpoint configuration, which makes it easier to quickly select an AF point.

The D7200 also features ‘Dynamic-area AF‘ which is suitable for shooting moving subjects. The camera will continue to monitor the surrounding points around the subject, so if the subject leaves that area of focus, the camera will continue focus on it using the continuous-servo autofocus (AF-C). You also get a 3D-tracking in which the camera uses all the AF points to keep track on the subject, Auto-area AF in which the camera automatically detected the subject using data from the the AF points and continues focus on it.

Among its other features are: 6fps burst and 7fps in 1.3x crop mode with improved buffer (16 RAW, / 100 JPEG), unlimited continuous shooting in continuous release mode with a shutter speed of 4 seconds or slower, timelapse movies, clean HDMI output (can output footage to both the camera and an external device at the same time), has Wi-Fi and NFC wireless connectivity,  1/8000 sec shutter speed,  14-bit Raw capture and 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor.

The Nikon D7000 was super responsive, the D7100 improved upon it and the new D7200 makes it even better. This is an excellent camera for anyone who demands super-fast performance and high image quality, especially for photographers who needs that extra advantage to be less limited when shooting in low-light.

So things are looking great for the D7200, but I know many people that will sacrifice some of those features just to get a Full frame camera. And now that the prices are lower than ever, maybe it’s time to make the switch and jump into the world of full frame photography. But I’m sure that you want to know whether you give up on something when upgrading to a FF, or maybe just gain more when you upgrade.

In order to answer this question, we need to carefully examine the the differences between the D7200 and the D750/D610 – we are going to do that right now.

D7200 vs D750 vs D610 – Side by Side Comparison

OK, now that you are quite familiar with the D7200 key features, you probably want to know how it stacks up against the two other full frame cameras, the D610 and D750. There are quite a few surprises here, so here we go!

Nikon D7200Nikon D610Nikon D750
AnnouncedMarch 2, 2015October 8, 2013September 12, 2014
Build QualityMagnesium alloy top and rear, polycarbonate front-plateMagnesium alloy top and rear, polycarbonate front-plateMagnesium alloy, Kevlar/carbon fiber–composite
Weather Sealingweather-resistant and anti-dust capabilities Same as the D800 and D300S.weather-resistant and anti-dust capabilities Same as the D800 and D300S.weather-resistant and anti-dust capabilities Same as the D800 and D300S.
The D750 is the most durable of the three. All three cameras have the same weather-sealing protection, which is great ("reliable dust and rain protection" - source).

Is the D7200 has rain protection? --- if all have the same degree of protection, which they are, so yet. I also rechecked and on this page you can see that it's written "Rugged body and sealing for reliable dust and rain protection".

Furthermore, for the D610: "all joints are effectively sealed for the same superior dust- and water-resistance as the D800 and D800E" (from the press release)
Shutter Life150,000 cycles150,000 cycles150,000 cycles
Sensor24.2MP (effective)
APS-C (23.5x15.6mm)
DX Format
CMOS

No OLPF

1.3x crop mode
24.3MP (effective)
Full Frame (35.9x24.0mm)
FX Format
CMOS

Has OLPF

(helps reduce moiré, aliasing and false color)
24.3MP (effective)
Full Frame (35.9x24.0mm)
FX Format
CMOS

Has OLPF

(helps reduce moiré, aliasing and false color)
ExpeedExpeed 4Expeed 3Expeed 4
Pixel Size~3.92 microns~ 5.97 microns~ 5.97 microns
There are some significant difference here as you can see.

First of all, the D7200 has APS-C size sensor, the other two are FF cameras. The resolution is about the same on all three cameras.

You can see that the pixels on the D610 and D750 are much larger than the D7200. In the next section we'll see how it affects the high ISO performance. The D7200 lacks the AA filter, which helps it resolve more fine details but at the expense of moire, aliasing and false colors. It shouldn't be an issue for most situations, but something to keep in mind.

Also the D610 is utilizing an old generation sensor.

Overall the D750 has the best specs, but we'll need to see how those specs turns into better results -- let's see!
ISO100 - 25600
Boost: 102400 (B&W only)
100 - 6400
Boost: 50-25600
100-12800
Boost: 50-51200
High ISO
Performance
D7200 vs D610: It might become a surprise for you or may not, but the Nikon D7200 performed much better than the D610 Full Frame camera. At ISO3200 the D7200 image is very clean image, very impressive!

The D610 ISO3200 image is quite noise with chrome noise apparent in mid-tones and shadows. This is not what photographers expect from a full frame camera isn't it?

That said, we need to consider the fact that this camera was released on October 2014 and has old-gen processor and sensor. But even so, I was expecting the larger pixels to do their job. Sensor technology really matters here and we can see that by looking at the results.

BTW, I used imaging resource comparometer tool to compare the sample images in various ISO.

At ISO 6400 the D7200 image is still very usable and relatively clean, but the D610 image quality is bad.

I would say it's about 2 stops advantage in favor of the D7200 - amazing results!

D7200 vs D750: OK, that's should be interesting, there is not excuses now :)

I am surprised again.At ISO3200 The D750 performance is significantly better than the D610, but even than the D7200 was able to surpass it. I can assume that there might be stronger in-camera NR on the D7200,

But listen to this. Jumping to ISO 6400 changes the picture completely. At ISO3200 there wasn't any big difference, but at ISO6400 the D750 shows it's strength and it easily passes the D7200 image with much less noise. This leads me to believe that the D7200 does employ stronger NR.

ISO 12800 is not usable on the D7200, but looks amazingly clean on the D750, what is that?! - This is exactly the performance you expect from a full frame camera. NR kicks in, but it was able to maintain the fine details and the image look amazingly clean.

ISO 51200 is too much even for the D750, and I wouldn't recommend shooting at that sensitivity. I can understand that because it's two stops out of the cameras standard ISO range.

The D750 has around 2.5 stops advantage over the D7200 in my opinion, but that difference becomes more noticeable after your pass the ISO 3200 mark. SUPERB PERFORMANCE, JUST WOW!
LCD3.2-inch
1229K-dots
Fixed

Not touchscreen
3.2-inch
921K-dots
Fixed

No touchscreen
3.2-inch
1229K-dots
Tilting

No touchscreen
The D750 has an advantage having a tilting display and highest resolution (shared with the D7200)
AF SystemMulti-CAM 3500 II
51 point AF
(15 cross-type)

f/8 supported by 1 sensors

Detection range: -3 to +19 EV

- 1.3x crop mode
Multi-CAM 4800
39 point AF (9 cross-type)

f/8 supported by 7 sensors

Detection range: -1 to +19 EV

- DX crop mode
Multi-CAM 3500 II
51 point AF (15 cross-type)

f/8 supported by 11 sensors

Detection range: -3 to +19 EV

- 1.2x crop mode
- DX crop mode
We can see that the D7200 inherits the D750 AF sensor, but the D750 AF system has more points that supports f/8 (11 vs 1).

Both the D750 and the D7200 are the obvious choice for low-light photography, not just because they perform much better in high ISO as we've seen above, they also have 2-stops better detection range, so the AF can work in dimmer lighting conditions. Some tested the camera in even lower range and like at -4EV and it still got the job done.

The D7200 and D750 also benefit from more AF points for better subject tracking performance.

No DSLR for what I know as a full frame AF at the moment. But the crop mode on each camera can help improve the subject tracking performance.
Shutter Speed30 - 1/8000 sec30 - 1/4000 sec30 - 1/4000 sec
D7200 has another advantage, it features 1/8000 sec maximum shutter speed which gives photographer better control over the exposure when shooting with fast prime lenses and it allows better freezing of very fast moving subjects.
Built-in Flash /
Hot-shoe
Yes / YesYes / YesYes / Yes
Flash X Sync Speed1/250 sec1/200 sec1/200 sec
Metering Sensor2016-pixel RGB sensor2016-pixel RGB sensor91,000-pixel RGB sensor
Both the D610 and D7200 use the same light metering sensor, whether the D750 has much more advanced sensor with 45 times more pixels.
ViewfinderOptical (Pentaprism)

100% coverage
0.63x equivalent magnification
Optical (Pentaprism)

100% coverage
0.7x equivalent magnification
Optical (Pentaprism)

100% coverage
0.7x equivalent magnification
The D610 and D750 have much larger and brighter viewfinder, as expected in full frame cameras.
Burst6 fps
7 fps in 1.3x crop

(18 RAW, 100 JPEG)
6 fps


RAW lossless compressed, 12-bit:
FX: 21
DX: 55

Raw lossless compressed, 14-bit:
FX: 14
DX: 34

Raw Compressed, 12-bit:
FX: 26
DX: 73


Raw compressed, 14-bit:
FX: 14
DX: 54

Jpeg Fine:
FX: 51
DX: 100


source
6.5 fps

RAW lossless compressed, 12-bit:
FX: 25
DX: 100

Raw lossless compressed, 14-bit:
FX: 14
DX: 48

Raw Compressed, 12-bit:
FX: 33
DX: 100


Raw compressed, 14-bit:
FX: 21
DX: 100

Jpeg Fine:
FX: 87
DX: 100
The D610 and D750 have larger buffer. In JPEG and in D format all can store 100 images, but the D610 and D750 can store more raw files in a single burst.
Exposure
Compensation
±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV steps)5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±5 (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)(2, 3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)(2, 3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
Video Recording1080p60 (1.3x mode only)
1080p30
1080p24
720p60

MOV (H.264/MPEG-4)

Stereo mic
1080p30
1080p24
720p60
720p30

MOV (H.264/MPEG-4)

Stereo mic
1080p60
1080p30
1080p24
720p60

MOV (H.264/MPEG-4)

Stereo mic
Mic InputYesYesYes
Headphone JackYesYesYes
Clean HDMI
(uncompressed)
YesYesYes
AF in VideoContrast detectionContrast detectionContrast detection
The D750 is the only one who offers 1080p60 progressive frames without needing to change to crop mode as in the D7200.

The D610 seems to be the least impressive among the three. You can expect the D750 to perform better in low-light situations as well.
WirelessWi-Fi / NFCOptional (Wu-1b mobile adapter)Wi-Fi
Battery Life
(CIPA)
1110 shots900 shots1230 shots
Dimensions136 x 107 x 76 mm (5.35 x 4.21 x 2.99″)141 x 113 x 82 mm (5.55 x 4.45 x 3.23″)141 x 113 x 78 mm (5.55 x 4.45 x 3.07″)
Weight675 g (1.49 lb / 23.81 oz)850 g (1.87 lb / 29.98 oz)750 g (1.65 lb / 26.46 oz)

Conclusion

The D7200 show itself as one of the most impressive APS-C cameras I’ve seen so far. The fact that it was able to outperform the D610 in high ISO tests and keep up with the D750 until ISO 6400 is quite a big achievements. The D610 is at its state much less attractive than the D7200 in my opinion. One reason to get the D610 is its low price and the fact that you can enjoy the larger viewfinder, take advantage of your wide-angle lenses and have shallower depth of field. Other than that, the D7200 perform better in low-light, has more advanced and more sensitive AF sensor, 1/8000 sec shutter speed, faster flash x sync speed, 1080p60* video recording, built-in Wi-Fi and NFC, better battery and all that in for a cheaper price.

The D750 is a different story. It really feel like a modern Full frame DSLR and we’ve seen what a modern full frame sensor can accomplish. Its high ISO performance is second-to-none, just mind blowing. This opens a whole new worls of possibilities when shooting under restricted low light conditions without a flash. Other than that,  it has a tilting display, more versatile AF sensor with better support for various apertures, it has both 1.2x and DX crop modes, has a larger viewfinder than the D7200, it shoots faster and has larger buffer when shooting RAW, can shoot 1080p60 out of crop mode, and has the best battery life among the three.

The D750 comes at a higher price tag. The image quality is one of the reasons why so many photographers want to pick up a full frame camera. You can also take advantage of the actual focal length of FF lenses, which is another big reason to pick up a FF camera. I just wasn’t convince with what the D610 had to offer in terms of features and performance. If those issues and its disadvantages aren’t an issue, the D610 is an excellent choice and the price is just right.

However, if you already investing quite a lot of money in a good body, why not spoil yourself with the D750, it is just a more modern camera with much better performance than the D610.  It’s up to you to decide, but if you are serious in becoming a better photographer and you don’t want the camera to limit you in any way, the D750 might be the best camera to get.

If you are tight on funds, get the D7200, it is an amazing camera, with superb all-around performance and features. You can invest the rest of your money in a better lens or another lens to your selection. It sometimes better to have more lens selection for various type of shots than investing all your money on an expensive body and having less flexibility. Just something I want you to keep in mind. Enjoy shooting and don’t forget to share your thoughts in the comments section below. Thanks for reading!

Buy the Nikon D750 from B&H Photo Store here

Buy the Nikon D610 from B&H Photo Store here

Buy the Nikon D7200 from B&H Photo Store here



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